ind-pvc-production

Volume Measurement in PVC Production


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General Process Information

Like all plastic materials, PVC (Polyvinyl chloride) results from a series of processing steps that convert hydrocarbon-based raw materials (petroleum, natural gas or coal) into unique synthetic products called polymers. The vinyl polymer is unusual, however, because it is based only in part on hydrocarbon feedstocks: ethylene obtained by processing, or cracking, natural gas or petroleum. The other half of the vinyl polymer is based on the natural element chlorine.

Ethylene and chlorine are combined to form a liquid, ethylene dichloride (i) which is then heated to give a gas called vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). A final step, called “polymerization,” converts the monomer into vinyl polymer. Pressure is applied to vinyl chloride (dispersed in water as a suspension or an emulsion) in high pressure chambers at temperatures of 50-70°C. The role of water is to remove and control the heat given off in the polymerization process.

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PVC Powder

Application: S-PVC is stored in storage silos prior to being delivered or packed.

Challenges: S-PVC in a PVC production facility is the end product. Operators seek to closely monitor the inventory levels, but the great amount of dust generated during the filling process complicates the task. The relatively low dielectric constant makes measuring the true volume of the stored S-PVC very challenging for any radar technology. Rosemount's 3D Solids Scanner systems, using multiple point-surface mapping technology, overcomes this problem and delivers accurate, reliable and continuous non-contact volume measurements even in such dusty conditions.

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S-PVC Vinyl Resins

Application: PVC powder is stored in silos prior to being delivered or packed. The silos can be very large in size containing thousands of tons per silo.

Challenges: PVC powder is the end product in a PVC production facility. Operators seek to closely monitor the inventory levels, but the great amount of dust generated during the filling process complicates the task. The relatively low dielectric constant makes measuring the true volume of the stored PVC powder very challenging for any radar technology. Rosemount's 3D Solids Scanner systems, using multiple point-surface mapping technology, overcomes this problem and delivers accurate, reliable and continuous non-contact volume measurements even in such dusty conditions.

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